Kiteboarding is out of the olympics Rio Brazil Windsurfing is back

In one day, the hopes of kiteboarders changed dramatically, as it was feared in the International Kiteboarding Association headquarters. On the 9th November, proposals to re-open the debate did not receive the required 75% of votes from ISAF Council.

The Events and Equipment confirmed the May 2012 decision and Formula Kite would open the way to the “box rule”.

Kiteboarding is out of the olympics Rio Brazil Windsurfing is back

Kiteboarding is out of the olympics Rio Brazil Windsurfing is back

Twenty four hours later, as reported by SurferToday.com, things could change and they did. In the morning of the 10th November, kiteboarding was in the Olympic Games. Now, it no longer is. Windsurfing is back to the future, en route to Brazilian waters.

This means that the Rio 2016 Olympic Games set for Brazil will have Men’s RS:X and Women’s RS:X competitions, only. Tension rose during the entire week.

Both the International Kiteboarding Association (IKA) and International Windsurfing Association (IWA) did not answer any questions before the ISAF decision proving that anxiety took control of the sports’ governing bodies.

During the entire year of 2012, it was clear that IKA and IWA could not communicate efficiently with each other. Cooperative actions were never seen and both wind sports wanted radical changes or conservative approaches, depending on the side.

A few hours before the final decisions, the official IKA page on Facebook was pouring sincere feelings. “First objective for us is not to reopen the debate. If this would happen, then there are various options on the table”, IKA wrote.

Windsurfing has been part of the Summer Olympics since 1984 for Men and 1992 for Women. The RS:X class by NeilPryde was introduced in the Olympic movement in Beijing 2008, with the One Design board concept.

Dutch windsurfer Stephan van den Berg was the first windsurfer to win a gold medal in the Los Angeles 1984 Olympic Games. At that time, the class was named “Windglider”. Scott Steele (USA) took silver and Bruce Kendall (NZL) took bronze.

Kiteboarders have been working for years to get their sport at the Olympic venues. With the support of media-hyped VIP and even windsurfers, kiteboarding grew and conquered ISAF officials.

As the Olympic drama comes to a close, windsurfers, kiteboarders and ISAF do not leave the process with an immaculate image. Will time heal all the wounds?

The sailing events for the Rio de Janeiro 2016 Olympic Games are:

Men’s RS:X
Women’s RS:X
Men’s One Person Dinghy – Laser
Women’s One Person Dinghy – Laser Radial
Men’s One Person Dinghy (heavy) – Finn
Men’s Two Person Dinghy – 470
Women’s Two Person Dinghy – 470
Men’s Skiff – 49er
Women’s Skiff – 49er FX
Mixed Two Person Multihull – Nacra 17

The Annual General Meeting of the International Sailing Federation approved the decision to keep windsurfing in the Rio 2016 Olympic Games with 51.3% of the votes, reverting the initial option for kiteboarding.

In one day, the hopes of kiteboarders changed dramatically, as it was feared in the International Kiteboarding Association headquarters. On the 9th November, proposals to re-open the debate did not receive the required 75% of votes from ISAF Council.

The Events and Equipment confirmed the May 2012 decision and Formula Kite would open the way to the “box rule”. Twenty four hours later, as reported by SurferToday.com, things could change and they did. In the morning of the 10th November, kiteboarding was in the Olympic Games. Now, it no longer is. Windsurfing is back to the future, en route to Brazilian waters.

This means that the Rio 2016 Olympic Games set for Brazil will have Men’s RS:X and Women’s RS:X competitions and kiteboarding will not be included.

Kiwi kiters off to Cagliari with an eye on the 2016 Rio Olympics

 

Four Kiwi kiteboarders will throw themselves in the deep end competing in the kiteboard racing world championships in Italy, with an eye on the 2016 Rio Olympics.

Yachting New Zealand boardsailing coach Dave Robertson will head the New Zealand team racing in Cagliari next week, to gain vital international experience now that kiteboarding looks likely to supersede boardsailing at the Olympics.

Kiwi kiters off to Cagliari with an eye on the 2016 Rio Olympics

Kiwi kiters off to Cagliari with an eye on the 2016 Rio Olympics

“No Kiwis have raced a regatta of this level before. In fact we have all only got into the race boards this year,” says Robertson.

The rest of the Kiwi team have kite or boardsailing experience – Matt Taggart manages Ozone Kites in Raglan, Ben Turner also kiteboards off the Waikato coast, and Justina Sellers, daughter of Olympic gold medallist sailor Rex Sellers, has represented New Zealand in boardsailing in recent years.

“We have come here to throw ourselves in at the deep end and learn as much as we can,” Robertson said from Cagliari, where the team is preparing for the championships starting October 4.

“We will be analysing everyone’s equipment and learning what it’s going to take to be competitive in kiteboarding in the future. All the preparation and focus has been our on water skills and speed as that is where we have the most to gain this early on.

“We want to understand all the competencies required to get to the top and make sure that we can build a strong long term plan for kiting in New Zealand.”

With around 2000 recreational kiteboarders in New Zealand, Robertson held training camps in the lead-up to this championship to find the strongest contenders.

Over 200 competitors will race in Cagliari on trapezoid, or windward/leeward courses, with the

option of slaloms at the end of the downwind legs. Races are intense at only twelve minutes long.

United States racers made a clean sweep of the podium in 2011, and their competition is expected to come from experienced kiteboarding nations France, Colombia and the United Kingdom.

SUZANNE MCFADDEN – BOATING NZ

 

 Fairfax NZ News

kiteboarding new Olympics classes RYA National Ranker Portland Harbour

The first weekend of the RYA Olympic Classes National Ranker took place over 22nd-23rd September at the Weymouth and Portland National Sailing Academy (WPNSA) and Giles Scott took a clean sweep of race wins.

kiteboarding new Olympics classes RYA  National Ranker Portland Harbour

kiteboarding new Olympics classes RYA National Ranker Portland Harbour

Racing got underway in a steady 12-14 knots with superb sunshine on Saturday with all classes managing four races except the Kiteboarding class – making its RYA National Ranker debut – who ran six on the opening day of the event.

But Sunday saw a different story with extremely strong winds gusting 40 knots preventing any further action at the 2012 Olympic sailing venue.

Giles Scott, who won the Skandia Sail for Gold Regatta crown back in June, was dominant in the heavyweight Finn class, securing four race wins ahead of Skandia Team GBR teammate Mark Andrews who posted four seconds in the seven-man fleet.

Mike Wood and Hugh Brayshaw, fresh from their silver medal at the 470 Junior Europeans, came out on top to secure their first National Ranker win in the double-handed event, three race wins and a fifth easing them to a five-point margin over Amy Seabright and Eilidh McIntyre, who posted 4,4,2,4 to top the female fleet.

In the 49er event, the new pairing of Edd Clayson and Mark Asquith battled off strong competition from Skandia Team GBR squad sailors Dylan Fletcher-Alain Sign and James Peters-Ed Fitzgerald as they posted 8,1,2,2 on the only day of racing to finish the weekend one point in front of their closest rivals, who occupy second and third respectively.

The weekend welcomed two of the new Olympics classes, which will make their event debuts at the 2016 Games in Rio.The new addition of men’s and women’s kiteboarding, which will replace windsurfing, welcomed 16 competitors who completed six races in Portland Harbour.

Tom Squires, along with many of the other competitors who have made the transition from the RS:X windsurfer, took three race wins in his first competitive kiteboarding event to top the table ahead of 15-year-old Oliver Bridge, the son of the four-time kiteboarding world champion, Steph Bridge, who took event honours in female fleet.

The Mackay FX, also referred to as the 49er FX, has been chosen as the women’s two-person skiff for 2016, and four crews did battle in a highly-competitive fleet with Frances Peters and Katrina Best (née Hughes) proving a successful transition into the new class as they topped the leaderboard ahead of Charlotte Dobson and Sophie Ainsworth.

Barrie Edgington, Skandia Team GBR Development Squad Manager, said: ‘The weekend was very successful with some superb racing on the Saturday. The two new Olympic classes were very positive. There was a good blend of existing kiteboard racers and RSX squad sailors. Working with the BKSA ensured that the test event for the RYA had competent racers and assistance with some of the new challenges of running this dynamic new class.

‘The RS:X windsurfers who have learnt their new trade over the summer months did very well in the kiteboarding event with Tom eventually coming out on top in an exciting and close fought six races against the more experienced boarders including four-time world champion Steph Bridge, and her son, Oliver, who filled the top places.

‘The girls in the 49er FX raced amongst a very competitive 49er fleet and did very well to hold their own in what were some fantastic sailing conditions. The four boats had some great racing with Frances and Kat emerging as the leaders, showing they have transitioned well into the new Olympic class for 2016.’

Edgington concluded: ‘It’s great to see Mike and Hugh continue their form in the 470 following their silver at the Europeans, they are certainly a team to watch out for in the future. The new teams who have only recently moved across from the 420 into the 470 are also looking very confident with some very strong performances at their first event which great to see.’

Entries are being accepted online for the second weekend of the RYA Olympic Classes National Ranker at the RYA Racing Event Website. The Notice of Race for the series can also be found on the event website.

To avoid a late entry fee entries must be made by Monday 8 October.

The recently updated 2012 RYA Olympic Classes Handbook now includes information on the three new Olympic classes, plus regatta details for all Olympic and Paralympic Classes, grant eligibility for both squad and non-squad sailors, and squad selection criteria for Skandia Team GBR.

2012 RYA Olympic Classes National Ranker – WPNSA:

Finn

1st Giles Scott
2nd Mark Andrews
3rd Peter McCoy

470 M

1st Mike Wood/Hugh Brayshaw
2nd Craig Dibb/Matt Rainback
3rd Richard Mason/David Kohler

470 W

1st Amy Seabright/Eilidh McIntyre
2nd Joanna Freeman/Katie Tomsett
3rd Anna Burnett/Flora Stewart

49er

1st Edd Clayson/Mark Asquith
2nd Dylan Fletcher/Alain Sign
3rd James Peters/Ed Fitzgerald

49er FX

1st Frances Peters/Katrina Best
2nd Charlotte Dobson/Sophie Ainsworth
3rd Mary Rook/Hannah Diamond

Kiteboarding M

1st Tom Squires
2nd Oliver Bridge
3rd Lee Pasty Harvey

Kiteboarding F

1st Steph Bridge
2nd Alice Shoulder
3rd Izzy Hamilton

Skandia Team GBR website

by Matt Carter

Kiteboarding at the Olympics 2016 – news updates

Kitesurfing for the Olympics information from Richard Branson, Reuters and BBC

 

Richard Branson. Founder of Virgin Group:

Kiteboarding at the Olympics in  Rio Janeiro Brasil 2016 information question about kiteboarding in olympic 2016  rio

Kiteboarding at the Olympics in Rio Janeiro Brasil 2016 information question about kiteboarding in olympic 2016 rio

Delighted to announce kitesurfing has been selected as an Olympic sport. It has just been accepted by the ISAF after a 19/17 vote and there will now be kitesurfing at the Rio Olympics in 2016.

Kitesurfing for the Olympics From Richard Branson from virgin founder

Kitesurfing for the Olympics From Richard Branson from virgin founde

This is fantastic news for my favourite sport and kitesurfers all over the world. As we build up to what promises to be an incredible Olympics in London this summer, it is perfect timing too.

Well done to everyone who has worked tirelessly with us campaigning to get kitesurfing accepted as an Olympic sport. Can’t wait to see the gold medal race in Brazil in four years time!

 

Reuters:

Olympics-Sailing-Windsurfers will dominate kiteboarding gold medallist

* Kiteboarding set to replace windsurfing at Rio Games

* Windsurfers don’t want Weymouth regatta to be the last

* Authorities facing legal challenge over decision

If kitesurfing replaces windsurfing at the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, most of the competitors currently on surfboards will also dominate the new discipline, the women’s gold medallist said on Tuesday. ”If they include kitesurfing, it will be the same people who will be competing, as in the world there are no more than 20 people (at the top level) … I think wind surfing will come back for 2020,” said Spain’s Marina Alabau. In May, the International Sailing Federation (ISAF) announced men’s and women’s kiteboarding would replace the RS:X sail board at the 2016 Games but a vote in November may yet see the decision reversed. The ISAF is also facing a legal challenge by windsurfing chiefs to the vote that could force an about-turn.

In windsurfing, competitors skim across the surface on a surfboard and hold onto a connected sail, whilst in kiteboarding, they stand on a much smaller board and are propelled by a kite which can lift them up in the air. Many of the competitors at the wind surfing regatta on England’s south coast said they wanted their discipline to remain, and that kitesurfing was more a “fun” sport which had not yet matured for serious competition.

“I think that kitesurfing is a fantastic sport, but not (for) racing … it’s a new sport that is still not developed,” Alabau added. ”There isn’t even (a uniform) design and I think that windsurfing is the best sailing sport, it’s really exciting … and there are a lot of countries that don’t want the kites.”

But she said that if kitesurfing was adopted, she would switch, as she and many others had gained experience in it. After news of the decision broke, Israel’s sailing chief Yehuda Maayan told Reuters that the ISAF decision to prefer kite boarding came about as a result of a voting error by the Spanish delegate at the ISAF conference. The Spanish Sailing Federation subsequently admitted its mistake, saying its representative had wrongly voted in favour of kiteboarding ”They said they made a mistake, but now they are going to realize that it was more than a mistake,” said Alabau, Spain’s only gold medallist at the Games so far.

France’s Julien Bontemps, silver medal winner in the men’s RS:X gold medal at the last Olympics in Beijing who finished fifth overall in Weymouth, added his voice to the chorus of windsurfers opposed to the switch. ”France is against the change. Does France want me to go to Rio on the windsurfing board? Yes for sure. In Rio there is no wind. If there is no wind there is no kites,” he said.

GIVE IT A TRY

Dutchman Dorian van Rijsselberge, who won the gold medal in the men’s competition, said had no strong feelings on which board he would prefer to use at the Rio Games. ”Everyone is enjoying themselves (windsurfing). I probably will go to California to try to get the hang of (kiteboarding). Why not?” he said. But disappointed British windsurfer Bryony Shaw, who finished seventh overall, said the

ISAF decision had been a “huge blow to the windsurfing community”.

“We are one of the more spectacular (sailing) classes to watch … and I don’t think you are going to get the same visual image from kiting. It would be a huge loss if windsurfing doesn’t stay in the Games,” she said.

 

BBC:

Kiteboarding will make its Olympic debut at the 2016 Games in Rio after the International Sailing Federation (ISAF) dropped windsurfing. The decision has been met with surprise and frustration within windsurfing and an online petition has been set up to keep it as an Olympic discipline. British sailing’s John Derbyshire said: “We’re disappointed for windsurfing.

Kiteboarding vs windsurfing

  • Kiteboarding - a wind powered surface watersport using a kite and a board to move across the water.
  • Windsurfing - a wind powered surface watersport using a sail attached to a board to move across the water

“[But we are] looking forward to working with kiteboarders to develop the talent pathway for this new event.” The decision was made by the ISAF at a meeting in Italy on Saturday and Derbyshire added: “While an exciting prospect for a new discipline, the decision to replace windsurfing will of course be a huge blow to the windsurfing community. ”We’re disappointed for all those who are working at the coal face of the Royal Yachting Association’s windsurfing programmes to deliver activity and British success on the world stage who will be affected most by this decision.”

GB will embrace kitesurfing says sailing boss

However, he added: “Kiteboarding made a solid case for its Olympic inclusion at the March trials and, although a surprise that ISAF has voted it into the Olympic programme at this stage, it appears they wished to seize the opportunity, rather than wait until 2020.” Britain’s Bryony Shaw, who won bronze in Beijing at the 2008 Olympics, said on Twitter:  “Windsurfing is me… I am windsurfing!” before adding: “My focus on London now seems heightened!! New discipline for Rio… New challenge…!”

Compatriot Nick Dempsey, who was fourth in the men’s event four years ago, commented on Twitter:  “Wow, unexpected. That was a big decision and a very sad day for windsurfing. My heart goes out to all the aspiring champions and kids with dreams of windsurfing at the Olympics.” Meanwhile, following sailing equipment trials held in Santander, Spain in March, the 49er FX was chosen for the new two-person women’s skiff discipline while the Nacra 17 will be used in the two-person mixed multihull event.
How many national sailing federations are ready to prepare kiteboarding teams, gear and equipment for the 2016 Olympic Games, in Rio de Janeiro?

Is there a global network of continental, national and regional kiteboarding competitions ready to define who will be competing for gold, silver and bronze medals in the 2016 Olympic Games?

Why was Course Race kiteboarding chosen to showcase in the 2016 Olympic Games, instead of Freestyle, when these kiteboard races will simply be just another speed sailing contest out in the regatta field?

How to ensure there will be enough wind to launch kites during the tight Olympic schedules? Has ISAF thought of an ideal venue in the Rio de Janeiro region?

What will NeilPryde do with the RS:X gear and are they interested in supplying the official Olympic kiteboarding equipment? While kiteboarding celebrates a hard-fought victory over windsurfing for the Olympic ticket, many questions remain unanswered.
In New Zealand, for example, a country with a strong Olympic sailing tradition, the national governing body is disappointed with the decision to replace windsurfing.

“We have recently invested significant resources into rebuilding windsurfing within our development programmes” said Yachting New Zealand’s Chief Executive Dave Abercrombie. ”This is a major setback but if it’s a fait accompli, we will have to adapt and get up to speed as soon as we can”.Yachting New Zealand does not currently have plan for its national kiteboarders and still doesn’t know how and who will prepare a team that will aim for glory in the class.